Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
CNBC 11
KCSMMHZ 10
KCSM (PBS) 5
CSPAN2 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
CSPAN 1
KICU 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 26
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
britain is debating whether to lead the eu, why does turkey want to become a full member of the club? and a man who came close to the european union's first marxist prime minister has increased the political and d in athens. he was nicknamed sexting slc -- secy alexi. we went to see if there really is this problem in greece. please be warned, there is some flash photography. >> greece is a place where economic crisis has given way to social crisis. strikes paralyzing the capital, and now, political violence. somebody fired a kalashnikov. now, the left wing has increase the ante, making accusations about the secret service in the 1970's. in 1969, a bomb in the -- in milan left several dead. it is a state with in a state. a strategy of tension. today, there is the gospel of the present great government. the coalition government brought about last year has stabilized the fiscal situation, but it is politically fragile. this is becoming perhaps the first marxist prime minister. >> a secret strategy of creating violent attention. >> it is not exactly a secret strategy. i think it has been
to provide a voice of the world. last week's european council agreed the overall limit on eu spending for the next seven years, starting in 2014. been agreed in the past, spending has gone up, but last week we agreed that spending should come down. by working with like-minded allies, we delivered a real- terms cut in what brussels can spend for the first time in history. as the house knows, the eu budget is negotiated annually, so what we were negotiating -- initially at the council last november and again last week -- was not the individual annual budgets, but rather the overall framework for the next seven years. this includes the overall ceilings on what can be spent -- effectively, the limit on the european union's credit card for the next seven years. during the last negotiation, which covered the period 2007 to 2013, the last government agreed to an 8% increase in the payments ceiling, to 943 billion. put simply, this gave the eu a credit card with a higher limit, and today we are still living with the results of allowing the eu's big spenders to push for more and more spending
on the show -- after grueling marathon negotiations, the eu agrees on a budget bill that for the first time sees a cut in spending. >> street battles in tunisia following the funeral of the slain opposition leader chokri belaid. >> millions are in asia heading home to celebrate the year of the snake. for the first time in the history of the european union, the long-term budget will be cut. 27 eu leaders meeting in brussels have agreed to a final budget during a second summit arranged especially to do so. we will go live to brussels for the latest in just a moment. >> that's right -- the drastically reduced seven-year budget is worth 959 billion euros and was hammered out after two days of nearly round-the- clock negotiations and is far less than the just over $1 trillion euros -- and the one trillion euros the commission had originally proposed. >> german chancellor angela merkel went into the talks saying she was confident the agreement would be reached. in the end, the 27 member states came up with a compromise that even british prime minister david cameron welcomed as a good deal for bri
a goal for the european union. after years of very little progress, the e appears to -- the eu appears to have an ally in what has. >> president obama announced the start of trade negotiations on a trade deal. brussels said talks could begin before summer. if successful, those negotiations would result in the biggest financial trade deal ever. >> the eu and u.s. already trade some 2 billion euros worth of goods and services every day. about 1/3 of total global commerce. president obama wants to bring that commerce into what would be the world's biggest free trade zone. the european commission says that would have world wide applications. >> which translates into tens of billions of euros every year and tens of thousands of new jobs. this offers us a great perspective at a time when we are gradually making our way to recovery. most important of all, it is a boost to our economies that does not cost 1 cent of taxpayer money. >> both sides stand to benefit. economists to warn that negotiations will be tough. the eu and washington disagree on issues ranging from industrial trade barriers a
'm kelly evans. these are your headlines from around the world. >> eu leaders are nearing a historical deal in brussels which could see the region's spending reduced for the first time. >>> chinese trade going gang bust ner january while inflationary pressures ease off thanks in part to the lunar new year effect. >>> this company must not disappear. that's the french government. it says it may invest in peugeot. >> and the yen says the currency has weakened too much. >>> welcome to the final program of the week. i'm pleased we've got to this day. >> we've had a lot of time together this week. i have. and that's not why i'm pleased we got to this day. >> yeah, yeah. >> strong numbers out of china. >> that's right. we saw a big improvement there. but i have to say frankly, most people's attention whether it's here or on the other side of the pond is the snowstorm. it seems like winds, 50 miles per hour. blizzard conditions in the u.s. we know when there's a storm like that headed for the biggest media market frankly in the world, it's probably all you're going to hear about for a while. >> th
the european union. i do going the way of european parliament for an eu able to meet the challenges and you need to come out and say that quite clear as your fellow citizens. mr. president of the republic. [applause] [speaking french] >> translator: i want to thank you for having got the budget treaty ratified in parliament because that's a good sign for europe, but i looked long and hard. i don't see what's happened to your 120 billion euros. where have those billions gone, mr. president? please tell us. we are legislators. and we are men and women of goodwill, but we have a responsibility to our fellow citizens. we get here to talk, teen ago she, you need to know that there are points which we won't give ground on. first of all, there is the question of flexibility. we need to have genuine flexibility in the financial framework between budget alliance and between news. that's how we have managed to run the budget properly in the context of austerity and balanced budget. second, own resource but if the european budget is going to be financed properly, it will allow us to reduce the contrib
, the eu has unveiled the details of a financial transaction tax it hopes to introduce next year -- the goal, raising tens of billions of euros every year and curbing speculation that can cause of people in the financial markets. >> but it is a very controversial measure. so much so that even less than half the state's leading lady the tax. >> the new tax will apply to billions of transactions a year. 11 eurozone countries including germany hope to introduce the tax this year. the levy would amount to 0.1% on trades and bonds, stocks, and currencies. >> what we have proposed is technically sound and legally robust as a tax, a tax which will strengthen our market and tim burke irresponsible financial trading. >> the eu commission wants to make sure companies do not just do their trading somewhere else, so the tax will apply if one of the parties is located in a participating country. opponents say that will not work. >> where a tax is suddenly imposed in 11 of the 27 eu countries, that creates pressure for companies to change their place of business. >> but the eu commission says
for the river and an island for the city. >> 1 trillion euros -- that's roughly how much the eu countries lose every year to tax evasion. brussels is not amused, not least because the euro crisis is far from over. now europe is looking for ways to more effectively track down and penalize tax dodgers. in italy, tax collecting is done by the finance police, the guardia de finanza. employees often used dubious methods when chasing down tax defaulters. the tax collectors work on commission. the more people they catch, the better for them. that is putting pressure on ordinary italians, especially small and medium-size companies. >> it was a spectacular protest against italy's new tax laws. the owner of a small beach bar scaled the dome of st. peter's basilica in rome and stayed put for some 24 hours. when he climbed back down, he was greeted by a cheering crowd. [applause] >> i really hope this tax issue is resolved soon and our small businesses as well as the whole economy can pick up again, at least a little. >> the tax measures by italy's technocrat government under the prime minister are anothe
at the new eu agreement to cap bonuses. it is aimed at a re-piece of the financial crisis. >> those in favor say it will address public anger about the role played by the banks and the economic meltdown. those against it, notably britain's -- britons, say that it will drive talent out of europe. >> the talks took more than 10 months. negotiators managed to clinch the deal despite opposition from the uk. at present, bankers can receive bonuses of as much as 20 times their basic salary. under the new rules, which can come into effect next year, they could be -- capped at one year's salary. >> most important thing is that banks will be stabilized, that a are better able to withstand the crisis -- that they are better able to withstand the crisis. >> it shows we are implementing what we learned from the financial crisis. >> critics say bonuses can encourage bankers to take unjustifiable risks in order to make more money. some say such behavior caused the financial and banking crisis. from now on, banks will also have to hold more capital as a buffer against any future crisis, a move intended to
. i know what that poll is saying, but i think there's a lot of confusion between the euro and the eu sometimes. i know that people think of the eurozone and the eu as sort of the same thing. >> the whole message from the conservative government has been a little confused. it's interesting and we'll play this a little later, but -- >> but they want to stay in the eu if they can negotiate new terms. you punish about there's a split in there because there will be one wing of the party that is essentially we want to stay and he are negotiate. the question comes is if they can't get everything they want, do they then say we tried, but we still better stay? a whole other wing of the party says, if we try and we don't get what we want, then we had better leave. >> and it's interesting. we asked earlier tr week about whether it would be bad for business if britain left the eu. actually, he seemed to say yes. in every the less, i think he serves in some capacity with the government, as well. he hesitated a little bit and says, well, yes, we'll play that tape. >> and how many other people actu
's time for business news. jamie has joined me. i know you're watching very closely this marathon e.u. summit, which is all about setting out the budget for the e.u.'s future. aum i think we sometimes tend to see this as being not an open figures, but i think this one is very important because of the possibility they might cut the budget for the first time in their history. in many ways, it's the end of an era, the end of an idea of a limitless expansion of the european union. the events being long and torturous. e.u. leaders have been going through the night as to try to agree as the next seven years, and it looks like a cut could be on the cards. this would be the first time, as i say, in its history. sums of money being proposed according to reports. leaders are closing in on agreement to set spending at around 9 0 billion euros, just short of that figure. some 275 euros a year for every living taxpayer in the european union. a massive 370 billion euros, about 40% of this entire budget, earmarked for subsidies to farmers and a fisherman. that pits them against the nations in south
year. >>> and the eu moves to clamp down on big paychecks in the banking sector, looking to cap bonuses on a banker's salary as early as next year. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> okay. we're back. you're mobiled up and we have some data. >> yes. it's such a mobile world, isn't it, in many ways. let's first talk about what's happening with the german unemployment figures. we were waiting on these. it turns out 6.9%, that is the unemployment level for germany in january. the unadjusted figure is 7.4%. it's higher than expected. you can see the forecast was for 6.8%. the prior month was revised higher. the rate itself was unchanged. that's a right i think here in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contr
are high this time around for some kind of deal. >> british prime minister david cameron wants the eu to mend what he sees as its wasteful ways. he made his point by arriving on foot, not in a chauffeur-driven limousine. he went into the talks in a bullish mood. >> the numbers that were put forward were much too high. they need to come down, and if they do not, a to be a done deal. >> that puts him on a collision course with many other eu leaders who argue the block needs a $1 trillion budget to fight unemployment, fund education and training and invest in the future. >> i of europe goes for compromise at any cost and puts common policies, agriculture, and growth at risk as a result, i will oppose it. >> with opinions so clearly divided, german chancellor angela merkel was keen to play down the differences and talk up the prospects of reaching agreement. >> the starting positions are quite far apart. but speaking for germany, i say we will do everything we can to come to an agreement. because in times of uncertainty and high unemployment, it is essential for people to be able to plan
and growth. >> angela merkel says all eu member states must cut costs. two weeks ago, the chancellor and british prime minister david cameron went out in brussels securing an eu budget cut of around 3%. now merkel has defended that decision. she says the crisis means everyone has to save. >> i will say it quite plainly -- it would have been hard to explain to people in europe, both to the states hit by the crisis and those bearing the bulk of the burden of solidarity why everyone in europe has to say except for europe itself. >> but the opposition disagrees. social democrats' candidate for chancellor peer steinbrueck says merkel advocates too much austerity and too little investment. he also accused merkel of making common cause with europe's foes. >> you've made an unholy alliance with no sense of perspective. and with a leader david cameron who may want to leave the you. it is a strange alliance if your aim is to safeguard europe's future for the days to come. >> strong stuff, but the opposition is the least of pass the budget draft.elelelel'o merkel's critics are gearing up for a
and african soldiers from neighboring countries. the malian army will be trained by military experts from eu countries. the war is likely to go on for a long time, and as a precaution, french police are keeping a particularly close eye on the islamists seen in france. the security of what level there is that read, signifying threats from terrorists arerobable. the malian community in paris is also coming under scrutiny. 100,000 malians live in france. most have come to work, and they live in residential homes. >> these women cook up the taste of home in their pots every day. this kitchen is not in bamako, however, but in a suburb of paris. and the television is turned on the whole day. the women's response is one of the light. around 600 malian then lived here in the rundown workers' hospital. they sleep six to a room and are in regular contact with their home country. this man wants to know how things are going for the french in mali. it is a whole different world here in the hostel, and outsiders are not usually welcome, but everyone here disputes that it is a hotbed of islac fanaticism. t
a warhead small enough to fit on a long range missile. the eu secured council called an emergency meeting. chery joins us now from seoul. can you tell us first of all what the general reaction has been there and a lot bit about the impact of the economy. we're watching, for example, the south korea and won take a hit this morning. >> well within not much of a reaction on the kospi. it did end down just about 0.26% here. but i wouldn't say it's a big tumble and it is korean won gained. i think by now investors have learned that north korea related tensions and developments, geopolitical issues like this have had impact on the korean market. so that explains the absence of such strong reaction on the stock market. but the latest that we have on this development is that we have china's reaction to north korea's nuclear tests, as well. china's foreign ministry statement goes that it is china's firm stance to realize nonnuclearization for the korean peninsula and prevent a nuclear proliferation and maintain peace and stability in northeast asia. remember, china is north korea's probably one an
to continue risky behavior. hi bonuses have since become a very contentious topics. the eu is currently working on plans to limit banker bonuses. it would be a historic first. a swiss politician also launched an initiative a few years ago. he was fed up with the high bonuses paid to managers in switzerland's top companies. now swiss voters will decide if stockholders of companies will be able to determine how much money managers get. >> if -- is thomas a modern-day william tell or simply obsessed with revenge? for months, the 49-year-old businessman has been promoting his initiative to tighten controls on executive compensation with countless speeches, debates, and interviews. 16 hours a day he is in the fight of his life. >> the debate in assembly's committee, blocks have been phenomenal. it is a real pleasure to have the swiss system of direct democracy and to use it as an individual. >> it began in 2001 when swiss air was ounded. for the swissthe bankruptcy of their debt-ridden national carrier was traumatic. in the company's last ceo -- then the company's last ceo took home some 10
for the first time since the e.u. began. leaders cut the budget to 960 billion euros over a span of 7 years, down from an earlier proposal of 1.03 trillion euros. a company with ties to the housing crisis is setting for an ipo. pennymac financial service, started up 5 years by the former president of countrywide financial. standford kurland resigned from countrywide in 2006. countrywide was blamed for risky lending practices and billions of dollars in defaults on subprime loans and was later acquired by bank of america. the new company kurland runs, pennymac, creates, buys, sells and services home loans. entergy stock lost power after the superbowl blackout last week, but earnings are energized. entergy's fourth quarter earnings nearly doubled on lower income tax expenses. shares dimmed during the week after a power failure cut lights in about half of the stadium for 34 minutes. entergy said the problem was caused by a faulty relay in its switching gear. the problem has been resolved. entergy closed down 49 cents at $64.47 on friday. hp wants its pcs to become more politically correct. the
, that's the last thing the eu or the eurozone needs right now. just when we get the signal of the panic button in the eurozone debt crisis, we have another cloud on the horizon. but that's nothing angela merkel can influence. i'm sure it's going to be a topic of discussion saying, look, is this going to be a government crisis? can you avert this? that is nothing we will hear about. the official communique will sound similar to what we heard out of paris, out of the monte meeting. don't expect a result on this budget summit yet on the table and on we go to the next rendezvous in terms of the budgets. we've got another eu summit in march, which is not -- which is not ear marked, of course, as a budget meeting, but i daresay we will trickle along nicely or unnicely until finally they reach an agreement on the next budget. in terms of the eurozone debt crisis, of course, that's the other point of discussion. at the moment, there's a little bit of cautious shoulder padd g padding, but it will be a bit more cautious because of the aforementioned festering crisis in spain. obviously, what we'
-claude junker says he expects the eu to real a deep on the budget today. juncker said the last of an agreement would be disastrous for the region. julia is in brussels. julia, are we going to get a budget? mr. cameron has said, look, i don't want it frozen, i want it cut. so what's going to happen? >> well, we're moving in the direction of cuts. i think the positive news is that if you compare what we were talking about in november, we've cut around 80 billion euros from the 1 trillion euro target that they were looking at back in november. so we are moving in the right direction, but with regard to the decision today, i think if you've been listening to angela merkel to david cameron himself and francois hollande this week, the indication is that perhaps we shouldn't be as optimistic as jean-claude juncker would have us believe, but someone has to fly the flag for europe and we like our posturing in europe. overall, what rewe looking at? germany, the uk, the nordic european countries are fighting for cuts, real term cuts in this whereas italy and france would rather have it held steady. even
a speech. i'd love to know what they're going to say bearing in mind that they're not exactly pro eu parliament. so that will be fascinating, won't it? let's face it, anti-austerity was the theme of this. bearing in mind, we've got 50% of voters coming around to say grillo or berlusconi, we don't want aus tearpy. anyway, the bill fall guy in this election was the prime minister, the technocrat who ran, marto monte. let's hear what he's been saying in the aftermath of these electoral disaster. >> translator: it's still too early to consider any solution, nor does it rest upon me to find one. but right now, i consider it is essential that there's maximum transparency between the political forces because we're all faced with a very serious responsibility. the government must ensure responsibility for the entire country. >> okay. so more analysis. alana fred reeko joins us now. you've had a big meeting today already, loradonna. you shook my hand. lovely. thank you. no one else did today. what did you guys decide is the way forward? >> following the outcome of the italian election, the si
by iran. e.u.'s ashton who has been involved said the meeting with iran will be on april 5 to 6, as well. the new offer we presented was balanced, fair basis for diplomatic talks. they won't detail what the new proposal are in iran. >>> and paris eads sharply higher after the aerospace group posted a better than expected full-year earnings profit as well as predicting a rise in earning in 2013. we have more. >> reporter: it's not a big surprise. a few weeks ago the ceo of eads said the company will be able to improve significantly its revenue and operating profit thanks to all of the divisions of the company. the main being the commercial aviation unit. also strong performance at europe copter, astrium for satellites and defense activities. all in all the operating profit beat expectations. 68% increase for the past year. three billion euros. the revenue was stronger than expected at $56 -- 56.5 billion euros. the most important is the outlook for this year. eads targeting a higher profit with an operating profit of 3.5 billion euros before exceptional items. 610 deliveries.between 600 t
, good to see you. thank you. >>> a bit of news out from google concerning the eu. it is now analyzing google proposals. no word on when they may finish analyzing it. >>> goombling, casinos took in $3.4 billion, up 7% from a year ago. but below forecasts of 10% to 12% growth. analysts attribute the low numbers to the traditional lull before the new year. this is all in macau, of course. these vip gamblers have scaled back their betts last year because of the uncertain economic outlook and the clampdown on corruption. in the auto world, toyota says its china sales are looking up. the world's largest carmaker sold more than 72,000 vehicles in china in january. that's up 24% from a year ago. it was toyota's first year on year growth since june 2012 in the country. anti-japanese sentiment has been hurting sales in china. but on the domestic front, toyota sales slipped 15% in january as government incentives expired. honda suffered an even steeper 53% drop. and staying with japan, we're seeing a couple of old school japanese electronics. toshiko has the story for us. >> hi, ross. struggling
because countries in the eu or even the euro zone are very, very different to what germany or portugal or greece or italy to the east, it's a very, very different situation, in that, that means we need also all a bit of time, education, infrastructure investment, all this is needed so that they have, let's say, a growth perspective for the next years. >> thank you. take another round of questions. >> [inaudible] >> the federal reserve hester medical increased its balance sheet since the great recession. about 20, 30 years, it didn't very all that much. suddenly very large increase. is the federal reserve comfortable in that it has an exit strategy so that we don't have either major inflation -- [inaudible] or major losses from purchasing assets and resale trying to bring back this money. thank you. >> a very quick to comment. [inaudible] i'm very happy to american colleagues. i think that we in europe -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> and in the back. did you have your hand up? >> that's what we do. any other questions? okay. is the one back you? >> i'm not an economist. i'm a
. in europe, the eu summit continues. but the action really taking its cues from china this morning. we have green arrows across the board in europe. take a look at asia. strong eco data out of china in focus. much more on that in just a moment. the road map begins at the golden arches. not even the cheddar onion burgers could help mcdonald's. they missed estimates in every region. asia was down a whopping 9.5%. >> exports boomed 25%, inflation cooled, but met expectations, capping off a two-week winning streak for stocks. >> a blowout quarter, users increase continued in momentum. >> the storm could be one for the record books. forecast calling for as much as 2 1/2 feet of snow in some parts of the northeast. already more than 3,700 flights have been canceled. we'll get more from the weather channel on the path of nemo. >>> mcdonald's down 1.9 in january. middle east and africa, europe saw a 1%, 2% decline. u.s. the only bright spot. comps up 9%. even some suggestion that asia, which is 40% japan, but also china, got tainted with the chicken contamination scare. >> that wouldn't surprise me
some of the things necessary to live up to their commitment to the eu. does this throw a wrench into the works? >> i think we should be thinking about it. the somewhat untold story is that -- >> you heard of this guy before this? >> absolutely. >> was he funny. >> he's funny. it would be a little bit like -- >> jackie mason? >> no -- >> seinfeld. >> robin williams or somebody. he was big in the '80s this guy. he also has been a big part of the political satire, all the rest of it. very, very bright guy. but you know, it's almost an a listic party. it's july real just truly a protest vote. to my knowledge it's gotten over 25% of the vote, the latest thing i've seen. monti is the best of the best. i honestly believe that is one of the, you know, on democracies it's easier to give stuff away. >> two years ago he had just started and i asked why are these pictures of monti in a beach chair. and they all said send monti to the beach. that was two years ago. >> yeah, he's only been in there a group -- grillo is moving. five-star movement is only three years old. it's a very organized,
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)